Although I’m going to talk about the WordPress CMS every now and then, I want to emphasize that this is primarily a direct comparison between WordPress.com and Bluehost. WordPress.com is the branch of the company that handles web hosting while WordPress.org is in charge of the CMS. I think that’s an important distinction to make moving forward because we’re primarily interested in what WordPress.com has to offer.

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‡ The following suffixes are on offer when registered using the embedded voucher code - .com, .co.uk and .uk. The offer prices are: .co.uk and .uk - FREE when registered for 1 year and .com £1.99 (ex VAT) for the 1st year when registered for any term. These offers entitle you to one .co.uk, one .uk and one .com at the offer price per account. Additionally, the following extensions will be offered at the prices shown (ex VAT) when registered on site for one year: .website - £3.00, .site - £3.00, .tech - £5.00, .store - £5.00, .fun - £3.00, .space - £3.00, .app - £12.00, .london - £14.99, .online - £3.50. Please note, for EU customers VAT rates payable will be subject to your country of residence. Offers are for the first billing period only, do not apply to renewals, cannot be used in conjunction with any other offers and may be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of Namesco Limited. Standard terms & conditions apply.
WordPress provides eCommerce integration but only with its most expensive hosting plan. In return, you get access to everything from site monetization and SEO tools to premium storefront themes and integrations with top shipping carriers. The features you get by signing up for this plan are certainly not bad but paying $45 a month is a bit steep if you ask me. By comparison, Bluehost only charges $12.95 for its most expensive eCommerce package.

We ran a poll on our Facebook group, Bluehost seems to be the #1 choice of the majority of our followers, and this happened even before Bluehost launched their current promo offering 65% discount; Right now MamboServer’s readers benefit of a special 65% discounted price for the first 12-36 months, to take advantage of this promotional offer click here and register, or keep on reading our comparison if you are not yet sure on what’s the best choice for you.
Arizona, United States About Blog Blog about decluttering your home to open space in your heart. Typical midlife changes call for a new direction. Residential downsizing & space clearing experts. When it's time for something smaller, we help determine what matters most to support your new direction. Frequency 18 posts / year Blog downsize365.com/blog

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A domain name is the name of your website or your website address. It's the place where users will find you on the Internet and it's unique to you or your business. Each domain name is made up of two parts. For example, our own domain name is names.co.uk, the first part is the name we chose 'names' and the second part is the extension 'co.uk'. Before domain names, web addresses were made up of a long string of numbers.
If you sign up with Bluehost and want to open an online store, you have a couple of different options at your disposal. If you use WordPress as your CMS you can set up shop pretty easily by installing a plugin like WooCommerce and figuring things out from there. Alternatively, you could sign up to one of Bluehost’s eCommerce packages, which allow you to create an online store for your website in no time. Each package comes with a WooCommerce auto-installer and configuration tool along with a number of other useful features.
Bluehost also offers three managed WordPress plans, with prices ranging between $19.95 and $49.95 per month. The prices of these plans are quite a bit higher but they include a lot of advanced features. A few of the highlights include daily scheduled backups, malware detection and removal, Jetpack Premium, business review tools, PayPal integration, priority customer support, and more. Some of these features are only included with the more expensive packages, however, you get very good value even with the cheapest plan.

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Before making a quick decision, we thought we would install the rail to get a good idea of how far away from the wall the door would hang, and if the trim would interfere with it at all. Bryan easily had the rail installed in less than an hour and didn't even call me in to help (using the included installation instructions). Yay Bryan! Except I was instantly confused by the placement of the rail. He used the large bolts that came with the rail kit and installed them directly into the wall studs. Which made complete sense. But, this meant that the rail didn't go all the way to the corner of the room (it was just an inch or two short). If you want to be extremely specific about the rail placement, then you actually need to install a ledger board into the studs first, and then the rail can be installed anywhere into the ledger. Bryan knew I didn't want to use a ledger board if I could help it, so he just assumed going into the studs was the answer. But then I wasn't sure if I loved that the hardware didn't land exactly into the corner. And that led to another decision to make.
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